Parish Assessor Reminds Homeowners of Special Assessment Levels

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St. Charles Parish Assessor Tab Troxler said there are several special assessment levels available to owners of St. Charles Parish – including one for those 65 and older, persons for persons with disabilities or disabled veterans and one for a person’s surviving spouse. who died while on active duty as a member of the armed forces or in the line of duty as a law enforcement or fire protection officer.

The special assessment level, Troxler explained, will “freeze” the assessed value of the property. In other words, the property value at the time of the application of the freeze will not change during future revaluation periods. The special tax level will remain the same as long as the applicant owns and resides in the house and the income does not exceed the maximum income set by the legislator. This special contribution level is lost if improvements exceeding 25% of the value of the house are added.

“It doesn’t prevent you from paying taxes or raising taxes, but it freezes the value of your home,” Troxler said of special assessment levels.

He added that his office has gone to great lengths to get information related to these special rating levels to the public, including mailing information to all owners in the parish and also including the information in the report. annual reviewer’s office.

Troxler said in 2020, 2,052 homes in St. Charles Parish qualified for special rating levels. This number is currently 2,647.

“There are a few things happening here,” he said of the increase in eligible homes. “One is a lot of public information, and the other is that many owners are getting older.”

Troxler said to apply for the special levels, homeowners must go to the Assessor’s Office, which is located on the first floor of the St. Charles Parish Courthouse at 15045 River Road in Hahnville. Regular office hours are Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The age 65 freeze applies when at least one owner of the home is 65 or older. The adjusted gross income of all owners cannot exceed $100,000 for the year. Documents required to apply the freeze include the owner’s driver’s license or birth certificate and federal income tax return.

The Disability Freeze only applies when the home owner is permanently and totally disabled. The combined adjusted gross income for all owners cannot exceed $100,000 for the year and the owner’s eligibility must be recertified annually each year the freeze is in effect. Documents required to receive this freeze include a disability award letter, driver’s license or birth certificate, and federal tax return.

There are two special rating levels available only to veterans.

The Disabled Veteran Freeze applies when the home owner has a service-related disability with a disability rating of 50% or greater. Adjusted gross income, combined for all owners, cannot exceed $100,000 for the year and required documents include a disability award letter, driver’s license or birth certificate, and tax return federal.

The additional exemption for disabled veterans applies when the owner of the home is a veteran with a service-related disability rating of 100% or the surviving spouse of a veteran with a service-related disability rating. at 100% service. Required documents include a disability award letter, driver’s license or birth certificate, and federal tax return.

Another special assessment level is available, and that is the additional exemption for surviving spouse’s homestead. The home owner must be the unmarried surviving spouse of someone who died while on active duty as a member of the armed forces or in the line of duty as a law enforcement officer or fire protection. The property must have been owned and occupied by the deceased service member, law enforcement or fire protection officer at the time of death. Required documents include a disability award letter, driver’s license or birth certificate, and federal tax return.

“If there’s one legacy I want to leave as an evaluator, it’s that I did a lot to educate the public,” Troxler said. “Not just on the assessor’s office, but on property taxes as a whole.”

Troxler said his office’s website – https://stcharlesassessor.com – contains information and videos for residents and homeowners to better understand property taxes, reassessment levels and other important issues.

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